Building better buildings

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Though most of our greenhouse gas emissions and energy use is related to jet fuel and planes, we operate too many buildings to ignore their environmental impact. Our footprint expands beyond the airports we serve to the Support Centers where our crewmembers work to support the daily operations.

T5 Farm

  • JetBlue is taking farm-to-air to a whole new level with an experiment in urban farming at New York's JFK Airport. On the Departures level of Terminal 5, JetBlue has built the world's first blue potato farm at an airport.
  • The urban farm produces approximately 1,000 lbs. of blue potatoes a season and about 2,000 herb plants, which are grown in recycled milk cartons using organic methods. The organic soil they are grown in partially comes from food waste collected at Terminal 5 which is composted by organic farms in upstate New York in partnership with JetBlue.
  • The blue potatoes produced are taken to TERRA's nearby factory where they are processed into blue potato chips for research of new flavors and ideas. All other produce is either used by businesses within Terminal 5 or donated to local New York communities through GrowNYC.
  • Customers can view the farm on the Departures level in Terminal 5.
  • More information is available here. Stay tuned for more announcements coming with the spring season.

T5 Rooftop

  • Recognizing the calming effect of literal green spaces, JetBlue built the only post-security outdoor space at a New York airport. The park is free for any customer (and pet) to use.

More natural light, less energy

Terminal 5 is our home at JFK, which gives us the freedom to use smart building techniques. Here are just a few highlights:

  • Strategic use of natural light, including T5's glazed landslide facade, glazing and light monitors, daylight sensors and an open light shaft allow for abundant natural light.
  • The use of fresh-air economizers with air handling units and revolving doors which help save energy and maintain a consistent temperature.
  • The reduction of heat via a light colored roof that reflects solar radiation.
Pictures of T5
Pictures of Long Island City Support Center

In 2012, we moved approximately 1,000 crewmembers into our new Support Center in Long Island City, New York (LSC). Here are a few ways that we reduce waste there.

  • The office features an open plan design, which allows natural light to permeate into the floors. Glass fronts on all office and conference rooms in the interior of the building further increase the flow of sunlight.
  • LSC is in a building holding a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Existing Buildings (LEED EB) Silver certification.
  • All appliances are Energy Star-certified and the HVAC system uses high-efficiency motors with economizers.